E.Coli | It’s Not All Bad News…

1.  E.Coli by Luke Jerram | Sheffield Winter Gardens | 31 October 2015 | © Little Bits of Sheffield | S_1040760

 

2.  E.Coli by Luke Jerram | Sheffield Winter Gardens | 31 October 2015 | © Little Bits of Sheffield | S_1040761

 

3.  E.Coli by Luke Jerram | Sheffield Winter Gardens | 31 October 2015 | © Little Bits of Sheffield | S_1040768

 

4.  E.Coli by Luke Jerram | Sheffield Winter Gardens | 31 October 2015 | © Little Bits of Sheffield | S_1040769

E.Coli sculpture by Luke Jerram at Sheffield Winter Gardens 31 October 2015.

I found these images in my archive from a couple of years ago, so I’m afraid this one is a little bit late!  I thought they were worth sharing if only to acknowledge that even bits of nature we perceive to be bad can be also be good.

Because of the harm it can do to humans E.Coli generally gets a bad press.  It wasn’t until I saw this sculpture and the description in the last photograph that I learned how scientists have been able to separate the good from the bad and the ugly…

Women of Steel

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‘Women of Steel’ in Barkers Pool, Sheffield.  A permanent memorial dedicated to all the women who worked in Sheffield’s steel works during both world wars.

The statue was officially unveiled on Friday 17 June 2016.

During the two world wars most men of working age were away serving their country.  Women from all over South Yorkshire , some as young as 14, were conscripted to work in steel works across the region.  After the war, as men returned they were forced out of their jobs.  The work undertaken by the women and their part in the wars was never publicly acknowledged.  Only after a campaign and a visit by some of the women to Downing Street when Gordon Brown was Prime Minister was there any acknowledgement of their role.  Gordon Brown was the first to publicly thank the women.

A campaign and public appeal headed by Women Of Steel Kathleen Roberts, Kit Sollitt, Ruby Gascoigne and Dorothy Slingsby, raised the £170,000 needed to commission the sculpture as a permanent memorial.

The bronze statue was created by sculptor Martin Jennings.

 

 

Castle House – Features

Click on any thumbnail image to enter the gallery and view the images full size

The sculpture located on the third floor of Castle House was designed by Stanley Leyland.  It features a fish and a foul and indicates the location of the restaurant.

Click HERE to view images of the central spiral staircase in Castle House

Click HERE to view images of the Board Room

Click HERE to view images of Castle House Restaurant

Click HERE to view images of signs at Castle House

Click HERE to view images outside Castle House